Class of 2004

Employment Patterns — 1982-2004 (NALP Bulletin, June 2006) — NALP's graduate employment data show that, historically, women and minorities are less likely to take jobs in law firms and more likely to take jobs with public sector employers. The table shows the kinds of jobs taken by the Classes of 1982, 1994, and 2004.

State Government Jobs in State Capitals (NALP Bulletin, January 2006) — Among Class of 2004 graduates, not quite 1,200 obtained a job with a state government. Interestingly, only 40% of these jobs were located in state capital cities, suggesting that students interested in state government jobs should not limit their searches to just these cities.

Market for New Law Graduates Is Steady (July 15, 2005 Press Release) — In the last seven years the employment market for new law graduates has remained relatively strong and remarkably stable, standing close to or above an 89% employment rate. This 31st consecutive report documents an employment rate of 88.9% for the Class of 2004.

Jobs for New Law Graduates — Trends from 1994-2004 (NALP Bulletin, July 2005) — NALP's employment data for the classes of 1994-2004 reflect changing demographics; however, in some job categories women and minorities continue to be significantly under-represented, while in others women and minorities are over-represented.

Jobs & J.D.'s: Employment and Salaries of New Law Graduates — Class of 2004 Class of 2004 Selected Findings (PDF - free download)

Trends in Graduate Employment — 1985-2004 (NALP Bulletin, June 2005) — Despite some decline in the overall employment rate since 2000, the market for new law graduates has been quite strong in recent years, with overall employment close to or above 89% since 1997. More than half of employed graduates obtain their first job at a law firm — a fact that has not changed in the 31 years that NALP has compiled employment statistics.

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