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What is the JD Advantage?

Click here for a detailed research analysis of JD Advantage jobs.

It turns out that the JD degree prepares you for a variety of exciting jobs and careers. While many law school graduates go on to practice law, many others go on to play leadership roles in a variety of settings. Many law school graduates obtain positions for which Bar Passage, or even a JD, is not required, but their legal training is deemed to be an advantage or even necessary in the workplace. As the saying goes "you can do almost anything with a law degree!"

You will see that JD Advantage positions are jobs that do not require bar passage, an active law license, or involve practicing law in the traditional sense. However, in these positions, a JD provides an advantage in obtaining or performing the job. In fact, many graduates view entry-level opportunities with the federal government or in business/industry as a primary goal. There are many law-related positions for which a JD is a significant competitive advantage.

Introduction to the JD Advantage

NALP has prepared a series of videos highlighting the significance of JD Advantage positions. These interviews shed light on some of the many kinds of positions taken by recent law school graduates. To view the JD Advantage in a higher quality or playback at full screen you may change the settings through the icons on the bottom right of each video.

The Communicator

Meet Amanda Nunez, JD, a graduate from the Florida Coastal School of Law, who serves as the communicators director for a US Congressman. Amanda uses her law degree to help her communicate with her Congressman's constituents every day, from writing newsletters to opinion editorials, her law degree has helped her become a prepared communicator. Since Amanda's first internship on Capitol Hill during her first year of law school, she knew that Capitol Hill was where she wanted to put her law degree to use.

The Reformer

Meet Cordell Carter, II, JD, a graduate from Notre Dame Law School, who serves as the Vice President for Operations for the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, the leading national nonprofit organization committed to advancing the charter school movement. After working in the private sector at IBM, Cordell needed more to get where he wanted to go, and he saw the law degree as a propelling event to a leadership path. Having spent summers interning for law firms, Cordell knew that the public sector afforded him more opportunities for leadership.

The Do-Gooder

Meet Destiny Moore, JD, a graduate from the University of Cincinnati College of Law, who works as a human resources generalist for the Archdiocese of Washington. As a human resources generalist, Destiny supports more than 170 organizations through the District of Columbia and Maryland areas with their employee relations. After serving in the US Army as a paralegal and graduating from law school, Destiny wanted to ensure that she used her experience and legal education to make a positive impact on society.

The Law Maker

Meet Mandy Mallott, JD, a graduate from THE Ohio State University School of Law, is a presidential management fellow who works as an Industrial Specialist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Mandy uses her law degree to help small and mid-sized U.S. manufacturers create and retain jobs, increase profits, and save time and money. Having previously interned at the League of Women Voters of Ohio and the Ohio Department of Development, Mandy knew that government service was always a career path she would be very happy with.

The Regulator

Meet Ella Yeargin, JD, a graduate of DePaul University College of Law, a presidential management fellow who works as a paralegal specialist for the Food and Drug Administration. Ella uses her law degree at the Center for Tobacco products to help its mission of overseeing the implementation of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act to set performance standards, review premarket applications for new and modified tobacco products and establishing and enforcing advertising and promotion restrictions. After teaching in the Bronx in New York and Houston, Ella always had the goal of public service as a career path. The views expressed do not necessarily represent those of the FDA or the United States Government



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