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Salary Distribution Curves

Class of 2013

For more information on the Class of 2013 salary distribution curve, see The NALP Salary Curve for the Class of 2013

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2013


Note: Graph is based on 21,545 salaries reported for full-time jobs lasting a year or more. A few salaries above $205,000 are excluded from the graph for clarity, but not from the percentage calculations. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for about half of reported salaries. The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for about 17% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by just over 5%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.


Class of 2012

For more information on the Class of 2012 salary distribution curve, see The NALP Salary Curve for the Class of 2012

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2012


Note: Graph is based on 20,709 salaries reported for full-time jobs lasting a year or more. A few salaries above $205,000 are excluded from the graph for clarity, but not from the percentage calculations. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for about 51% of reported salaries. The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for about 16% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by about 7%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.


Class of 2011

For more information on the Class of 2011 salary distribution curve, see The NALP Salary Curve for the Class of 2011

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2011



Note: The graph above is based on 18,630 salaries reported for full-time jobs lasting a year or more — a few salaries above $200,000 are excluded from the graph for clarity, but not from the percentage calculations. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for about 52% of reported salaries. The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for about 14% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by just over 6%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.


Class of 2010

For more information on the Class of 2010 salary distribution curve, see The NALP Salary Curve Morphs with the Class of 2010

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries


Note: The graph above is based on 18,398 salaries. A few salaries above $200,000 are excluded for clarity. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for about 48% of reported salaries. The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for about 18% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by about 9%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean figure. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.


Class of 2009

For more information on the Class of 2009 salary distribution curve, see Salary Distribution Curve for the Class of 2009 Shows Relatively Few Salaries Were Close to the Mean

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2009


Note: The graph is based on 19,513 salaries. A few salaries above $200,000 are excluded for clarity. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for 42% of reported salaries.The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for 25% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by about 10%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean figure. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.


Class of 2008

For more information on the Class of 2008 salary distribution curve, see Starting Salary Distribution for Class of 2008 More Dramatic than Previous Years

Distribution of Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2008


Note: Graph is based on 22,305 salaries; a few salaries about $200,000 are excluded for clarity. Collectively, salaries of $40,000 - $65,000 accounted for 42% of reported salaries.


Class of 2007

For more information on the Class of 2007 salary distribution curve, see Another Picture Worth 1,000 Words.


Source:Jobs & JD's, Class of 2007

Note: The graph is based on 23,337 salaries. A few salaries above $200,000 are excluded for clarity. 


Class of 2006

For more information on the Class of 2006 salary distribution curve, see A Picture Worth 1,000 Words.


 

Source:Jobs & JD's, Class of 2006. For the purposes of the Jobs and JD's report, the curve was smoothed to more clearly illustrate the bimodal nature of the curve, and thus does not appear identical to the curve shown for the Class of 2006 in the January 2008 Bulletin column here. The curve presented in the January 2008 Bulletin article is also shown on a different scale for ease of comparison with previous years.
Note: The graph is based on 22,665 salaries. A few salaries above $200,000 are excluded for clarity. The first peak in this graph reflects salaries of both $40,000 and $50,000 (each about 11% of reported salaries). The second peak reflects salaries of $135,000 (10% of reported salaries) and $145,000 (7% of reported salaries).



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