Weekly News Digest for Legal Career Professionals

Each week NALP's Executive Director, James Leipold, provides a summary of news articles of interest to legal career professionals. Read past issues here.

For news in the public interest arena, see the news digest from Christina Jackson, NALP's Director of Public Service Initiatives and Fellowships, at www.psjd.org.


February 24, 2017
  1. "'The Brexit vote has been a trigger' — law firms look to Ireland amid concerns over London's future," 02.23.17.
    Legal Week reports that with all of the uncertainty surrounding Brexit, international firms that once sought a base in London are now eyeing Dublin.

  2. "California Needs Another Law School, State Legislator Says," 02.22.17.
    The Recorder reports that a California state legislator has introduced legislating endorsing the creation of a new law school at UC Riverside. (Login required)

  3. "Is Your Firm Guilty of Playing Lateral Partner Bingo?," 02.22.17.
    Dan Binstock, writing for The American Lawyer, offers pointers for law firms that wish to distinguish themselves in the crowded lateral market. (Login required)

  4. "Standing Up for What I Need," 02.22.17.
    A great op-ed in The New York Times by a trial lawyer with a disability: "I was already an experienced trial lawyer by the time I learned I had multiple sclerosis in 1995, at age 41…. Since I started trying cases from a wheelchair 12 years ago, my relationship to my profession has changed."

  5. "Yale Names Heather Gerken as First Woman Law Dean," 02.21.17.
    The National Law Journal reports that Yale Law professor Heather Gerken will assume the deanship on July 1, the first female to hold that role. (Login required)

    1. "Meet Heather Gerken, Yale's First Woman Law Dean," 02.23.17.
      Karen Sloan interviews Heather Gerken for The National Law Journal: "I wasn't sure I wanted the job a few years ago, mostly because being a law professor at Yale Law School may be the best job in the world. But two things really have motivated me. The first was serving on the diversity and inclusion committee two years ago. It made me realize how much I care about building an institution, and that I actually get sustenance from doing it. The second piece is, I have a sense this is a moment in time when law schools are particularly important and relevant to ongoing debates. As someone who practiced for a fair amount of time, I feel deeply that law schools need to defend and protect the nonpartisan values of the profession. I want to be part of that conversation."

  6. "Preparing for the Unexpected Firm Dissolution," 02.21.17.
    Two law firm partners from Dentons writing here for The Recorder, explain how and why all firms should proactively prepare for dissolution, however unlikely and unwanted that end may be. (Login required)

  7. "It's Official: Norton Rose Fulbright, Chadbourne & Parke Catch Merger Fever," 02.21.17.
    The American Lawyer reports that "Norton Rose Fulbright confirmed Tuesday that it will merge with Chadbourne & Parke, creating a combined law firm with revenues of just under $2 billion." (Login required)

  8. "Employers Expecting Moderate to Massive Workplace Shift," 02.21.17.
    Corporate Counsel reports on the results of the inaugural Future Employer Outlook Survey conducted by Seyfarth Shaw: "Most employees, including in-house counsel, are hopeful about the future of the workplace as it relates to technology and innovation. But 30 percent are outright fearful about potential shifts on the horizon." (Login required)

  9. "Big Law and the Case of the Missing Demand," 02.21.17.
    ALM Legal Intelligence provides this Law.com piece on falling demand for law firm services, not falling demand for legal services: "Law departments are in the midst of completely rethinking their approach to how they procure legal services." (Login required)

  10. "When Leaving Big Law, the Financial Struggle Is Real," 02.21.17.
    Leigh Jones, writing for The American Lawyer, profiles some Big Law associates who have left law firm life behind, and the financial challenges that they face as a result. (Login required)

  11. "The warm winter means cherry blossoms will peak early — here's how soon it could be," 02.21.17.
    Courtesy of The Washington Post, in case you are planning on visiting us here in DC this spring: "At the Tidal Basin, the cherry trees are already sprouting buds ….It suggests we're probably going to hit peak bloom well before the average date of April 4."

  12. "Reinventing Professionals: There are jobs in the emerging legal gig economy," 02.17.17.
    For the ABA Journal, Ari Kaplan speaks with an e-discovery/cybersecurity staffing agency about employing lawyers and others in the gig economy: "We find that over 43 percent of Americans are now working on contract, which is starting to affect the e-discovery marketplace. People are finding that it's a very lucrative way to reinvent themselves and move their careers in a different direction."

  13. Law Firm Year-End Financial Reporting

    1. "Hogan Lovells Boosts Revenue 6 Percent While Profits Remain Flat," 02.24.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 6%, PPP flat)

    2. "Polsinelli Saw Strong Revenue Growth in 2016, But Partner Profits Dropped With Addition of 44 Lawyers," 02.23.17. (The American Lawyer: Profits up 7.1%, PPP down 4.1%)

    3. "Latham Has Another Outstanding Year, With Revenue Surpassing $2.8B," 02.23.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 6.5%, PPP up 5.3%)

    4. "Reversing Profit Decline, Covington Posts Double-Digit Growth," 02.23.17. (The National Law Journal: Revenue up 13%, PPP up 16%)

    5. "Shearman & Sterling Sees Revenue rise and Partner Profits Spike," 02.22.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 6%, PPP up 18%)

    6. "Steady Growth for Faegre Baker as Leadership Change Looms," 02.22.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 5%, PPP up 7.5%)

    7. "Sidley Keeps Revenue, Profits Rising Despite Tougher Market," 02.22.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 3.4%, PPP up 3.1%)

    8. "Drinker Biddle Grows Revenue, PPP 6 Percent," 02.22.17. (The Legal Intelligencer: Revenue up 6.1%, PPP up 6.3%)ead

    9. "Partner Profits Break $1M in Another Big Year for Troutman Sanders," 02.22.17. (Daily Report: Revenue up 4.6%, PPP up 5%)

    10. "McGuireWoods Revenue Up 4 Percent Following Lateral Additions," 02.21.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 4%, PPP down 4%)

    11. "Holland & Knight Sees Strong Growth in Revenue and Income," 02.17.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 8%, PPP up 3.2%).

    12. "Gross Revenue, Partner Profits Rise at Cahill Gordon," 02.17.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 4.9%, PPP us 8.2%)

    13. "Milbank Tweed Reports 'Outstanding' Results for 2016," 02.17.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 11%, PPP up 12.8%)

    14. "Paul Weiss Reaps Benefits From Star Lateral Hires," 02.17.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 10.1%, PPP up 7.1%)

    15. "Slow Collections Drag on Growth at Steptoe," 02.17.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue, PPP flat)



    Past News Digests

    Prior digests for past weeks are provided below for reference; some articles may no longer be offered online or may have moved to different URLs than the links shown here.


    February 17, 2017

    1. "Gibson Dunn Partner To Become Vermont Law Dean." 02.16.17. (Login required)
      The Recorder reports that Vermont Law School has announced that Thomas McHenry, an environmental lawyer at Gibson Dunn, will become the new dean on July 1.

    2. "Law Dean Alexander Acosta Picked for Labor Secretary," 02.16.17. (Login required)
      The National Law Journal reports that R. Alexander Acosta, the dean of Florida International University College of Law and the son of Cuban immigrants, has been nominated to be the US Secretary of Labor.

    3. "Cultural Competence and the Next Generation of Lawyers and Lawyer Regulation," 02.16.17.
      A good column in Slaw from a University of Ottawa law professor argues that cultural competence is part of lawyer competence, and suggests that a duty of cultural competence ought to be incorporated into professional conduct rules.

    4. "The Bespoke Model Is Broken," 02.15.17.
      This Slaw blog post argues that "with automation, artificial intelligence, and the Internet, we are no longer limited to the bespoke model."

    5. "Any LSAT alternatives must be validated through new process, according to proposed rule revision," 02.14.17.
      The ABA Journal reports that at its March meeting, the Council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar will consider a proposed revision of Standard 503 that would establish a process to determine the reliability and validity of entrance exams other than the LSAT for admission to law school.

    6. "Want to Improve Associate Hiring? Follow Public Interest Lead," 02.14.17. (Login required)
      Karen Sloan, writing for The National Law Journal, reports on the results of new survey research from Educating Tomorrow's Lawyers: "Law firms could learn a thing or two from the way public interest law organizations and government agencies hire new attorneys."

    7. "Frustrated Law Deans Take Bar-Exam Complaints to Lawmakers," 02.14.17. (Login required)
      The Recorder reports that reports that the deans at twenty of twenty-one California law schools accredited by the ABA signed a letter asking the state Supreme Court to temporarily lower the bar exam scoring requirement while the bar studies the cause for the drop in bar pass rates in the state.

    8. "Citi Report: Growth Slowed in 2016," 02.13.17. (Login required)
      Gretta Rusanow, writing for The American Lawyer, reports 2016 year-end law firm financial data from Citi Private Bank: "Last year was a better one than 2015 for the Am Law 50, and especially for the most profitable firms. The same can't be said for the rest of the industry." (Revenue up 3.8%, PPP up 4.1%, Demand up 0.1%, Lawyer headcount up 1.7%, Average lawyer productivity down 1.4%, Expenses up 3.4%, Compensation up 5.4% — "Beyond the industry averages, we continued to see performance dispersion.")

      1. "Some law firm leaders question associate pay hikes amid tepid year," 02.15.17.
        The ABA Journal reports on the newest Citi report, noting that some law firm leaders feel the associate pay hike last year has put undue financial pressure on some law firms: "many express bafflement as to why so many firms adopted the increases when their productivity and profitability results couldn't support them."

    9. "HP, Mandating Diversity, Will Withhold Fees From Some Firms," 02.13.17. (Login required)
      Corporate Counsel reports that HP's chief legal officer has sent a letter to its partner law firms informing them that it will withhold ten percent of all amounts invoiced if a firm fails to meet minimum diversity staffing requirements.

      1. "HP's GC Says 'Diversity Mandate' Embraced by Law Firms," 02.14.17.
        The Recorder talks with HP GC Kim Rivera about the new hold-back program, and how law firms are reacting.

    10. "Big Law Brand Survey Shows Client-Led Shakeup," 02.13.17. (Login required)
      The American Lawyer reports that after six years at the top of the chart, Skadden has been unseated as the number one preferred brand by in-house lawyers in the annual Acritas US Law Firm Brand Index, replaced by Jones Day.

    11. "Separating Fact from Fiction: AI as 'Actually' Used by Lawyers of Today and Tomorrow," 02.13.17. (Login required)
      Legaltech News takes a look at how law firms are actually using artificial intelligence today, and how they might be using it in the future.

    12. "K&L Gates Cuts Staff Across Offices," 02.10.17. (Login required)
      The Legal Intelligencer reports that K&L Gates has laid off a "substantial" number of staff across offices in order to reduce overhead expenses.

    13. Law Firm Year-End Financial Reporting

      1. "Locke Lord's Revenue Down But Income Up," 02.16.17. (Texas Lawyer: Revenue down 6.4%, PPP up 6.7%)
      2. "Amid Departures, Pepper Hamilton Revenue Drops 10 Percent, PPP Down 28 Percent," 02.16.17. (The Legal Intelligencer: Revenue down 10.6%, PPP down 28.8%)
      3. "On Upward Trajectory, Akin Gump Invests in Regulation, Policy,"02.15.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 5.4%, PPP up 9.7%)
      4. "King & Spalding Hits New Mega-Firm Milestone," 02.15.17. (Daily Report: Revenue up 3.8%, PPP down 1.8%)
      5. "White & Case Posts Gains as Transatlantic Push Continues," 02.15.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 7.1%, PPP up 1.5%)
      6. "Cooley's Tech Clients Buoyed Firm's Finances in 2016," 02.15.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 6.8%, PPP up 4.2%)
      7. "Deals, Restructuring Drive 'Best Year Ever' for Davis Polk," 02.15.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 10.3%, PPP up 12.5%)
      8. "Alston & Bird Boosts Revenue, Head Count," 02.13.17. (Daily Report: Revenue up 6.2%, PPP up 4%)
      9. "Crowell & Moring Sees Big Lift in Profits, Revenue," 02.13.17. (The National Law Journal: Revenue up 20%, PPP up 40%)
      10. "Fish & Richardson's Revenue and Profits Up After 'Really Strong Year'," 02.13.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue up 3.2%, PPP up 6.7%)
      11. "Cozen O'Connor, in Growth Mode, Sees Revenue Bump," 02.13.17. (The Legal Intelligencer: Revenue up 10%, PPP up 3.4%)
      12. "A Smaller Cadwalader Sees Revenue Drop, Profits Rise," 02.10.17. (The American Lawyer: Revenue down 2.5%, PPP up 2.7%)



      February 10, 2017

      1. "How to Teach Tech: Dean Michael Schwartz on Law Education 2.0," 02.09.17.
        Legaltech News speaks with a law school dean about how legal education is keeping up with the times: "I believe law schools are increasingly including legal tech training in their required or at least elective courses, and while I do not anticipate that lawyers will need to become experts at programming or at data analytics, they will need to be experts at using technology and evaluating the results of data analytics. Legal tech will therefore have to become an increasingly important part of legal education." (Login required)

      2. "Alternative Legal Service Provider Adoption All About Cost Savings? Perhaps Not," 02.09.17.
        Law.com dives into the alternative legal services provider report issued last week by Georgetown/Thomson Reuters/Oxford: "Access to specialized expertise not available in-house was the No. 1 reason for the four most-used types of ALSP services beyond e-discovery and document review - regulatory risk and compliance services, specialized legal services, intellectual property management, and legal research services." If you didn't see the report last week you can find it here. (Login required)

      3. "Is Big Law Finally Ready For Trans-Atlantic Consolidation?," 02.09.17.
        The American Lawyer takes a look at the future of transatlantic law firm mergers, forecasting more of them on the horizon. (Login required)

      4. "A Secret of Many Urban 20-Somethings: Their Parents Help With the Rent," 02.09.17.
        The New York Times reports that new research suggests 40 percent of 22- 23- and 24-years olds receive financial help from their parents. ("Young people in metro areas with a million or more people are 30 percent more likely to receive rent money from their parents than those in smaller cities…[and]the big-city residents receive twice as much support.")

      5. "Affluent students get law school merit scholarships while others foot the bill, study finds," 02.08.17.
        The ABA Journal reports on the latest findings from the annual Law School Survey of Student Engagement, including the finding that "law schools have become more generous with merit scholarships, and the money has been flowing to privileged students whose parents are college-educated…individuals whose parents had no college experience were the least likely to receive merit scholarships."

        1. "Study: Law School Aid Likely to Go to White Students," 02.09.17.
          And more on this from Inside Higher Ed: "A statement from Aaron N. Taylor, director of the study and associate professor at Saint Louis University School of Law, said, 'While law schools have become more generous in awarding scholarships to students, this bounty has not been spread evenly or equitably. Narrow conceptions of merit ensure that scholarship funds flow more generously to students most likely to come from privileged backgrounds — leaving students from disadvantaged backgrounds bearing more of the risks associated with attending law school. The end result is a cascade of negative outcomes, including a perverse cost-shifting strategy through which disadvantaged students subsidize the attendance of their privileged peers. This is the hallmark of an inequitable system.'"

        2. "Minority Law Students Subsidize Scholarships, Study Finds," 02.09.17.
          And Karen Sloan, writing for Law.com, also covers the new LSSSE survey findings, and interviews the study's author: "Among Latinos, 57 percent expected to have more than $100,000 in law school debt, as did 53 percent of black respondents. Meanwhile, just 38 percent of white students anticipated a debt load of $100,000 or more. That figure was 40 percent among Asian students." (Login required)

      6. "Speak Up, Find Mentors and Other Tips From Women Attorneys at the Top,"02.08.17.
        The Recorder shares tips from successful women attorneys from the Women LEAD program held at UCLA School of Law.

      7. "Will My Career Always Feel This Toxic?," 02.08.17.
        A behavioral health consultant, writing for Law.com, offers stressed-out junior associates some advice for coping. (Login required)

      8. "How to Close a Gender Gap: Let Employees Control Their Schedules," 02.07.17.
        The New York Times makes the case for giving employees flexibility over their schedules, particularly if organizations are serious about closing the gender gap.

      9. "For-Profit Law School Faces Crisis After Losing Federal Loans," 02.07.17.
        The New York Times reports on developments at Charlotte Law School: "The for-profit school, with hundreds of students, remains in business, even without the lifeline of federal student aid. It is counting on the Education Department under the Trump administration to reopen the loan spigot that the agency turned off last month after the American Bar Association…found that the school did not satisfy its admissions and curriculum standards."

        1. "Charlotte School of Law reportedly files teach-out plan to ABA," 02.06.17.
          The ABA Journal reports that Charlotte School of Law has submitted a teach-out plan: "Under the plan, Florida Coastal will disburse Title IV funds, with Charlotte School of Law being the degree-granting institution. It's expected that the plan will run until December 2019, which is reportedly the last anticipated graduation date of currently enrolled students."

      10. "ABA Rejects Stricter Bar-Pass Rule for Law Schools," 02.06.17.
        The National Law Journal reports that "the American Bar Association's House of Delegates on Monday rejected a measure to tighten the existing bar pass rule after a coalition of law deans and diversity advocates mounted a fourth-quarter campaign against it."

        1. "ABA Rejects Proposal to Toughen Accreditation," 02.07.17.
          Inside Higher Ed also reports on this development: "The American Bar Association House of Delegates on Monday rejected a proposal to require all law schools it accredits to have 75 percent of their students who sit for bar exams pass them within two years of graduation." (Login required)

        2. "ABA's Rejection of Stricter Bar-Passage Rule Draws Support, Criticism," 02.07.17.
          And law.com reports on the aftermath of the ABA decision not to tighten the bar-passage standard for law schools.

        3. "ABA House rejects proposal to tighten bar-pass standards for law schools," 02.06.17.
          More on this from the ABA Journal.

      11. "Hiring From Abroad Requires Visa Know-How," 02.06.17.
        An immigration partner writing for the Daily Report takes a look at the super-competitive H-1B visa program, and explores nonimmigrant work visa options when the H-1B is not available. (Login required)

      12. "Study Finds Only Modest Gains by Women and Minorities on Fortune 500 Boards," 02.05.17.
        The New York Times reports on new research that shows "women and minorities occupy nearly 31 percent of the board seats of Fortune 500 companies, a small increase over the last four years."

      13. "Global Lateral Hiring by The Numbers: A Look Behind the High 5-Year Attrition Rate," 02.03.17.
        The American Lawyer drills down on five years' worth of lateral partner data from Am Law 200 firms and concludes "half of lateral hires are failures." (Login required)

      14. "How can law schools encourage diversity and opportunity? Two Florida deans speak out," 02.03.17.
        The ABA Journal reports on the proceedings at a panel at the ABA midyear meeting this week — the panel addressed how law schools are adapting to a changed market.

      15. "Working In-House With a Disability," 02.03.17.
        Corporate Counsel reports on remarks made by panelists in New York at an event about removing barriers in the workplace where two in-house lawyers spoke about their careers as lawyers with disabilities. (Login required)

      16. "Law Firm General Counsel Roles Are Evolving — And Sometimes 'Lonely'," 02.03.17.
        The American Lawyer takes a look at the evolving role of the law firm general counsel. (Login required)

      17. "Changes to ABA Legal Ed Power Structure Blunted," 02.03.17.
        The National Law Journal reports that "the ABA's Board of Governors on Friday approved the creation of a Commission on the Future of Legal Education, but it did not sign off on the extensive slate of responsibilities that the commission would have under the original proposal from ABA president-elect Hilarie Bass." (Login required)

      18. Law Firm Year-End Financial Reporting

        1. "Ballard Spahr Sees Small Revenue Bump as Profits Stay Flat," 02.09.17.
          The Legal Intelligencer reports that "Ballard Spahr experienced slight revenue growth and flat profits in 2016, making the best of what the firm said it knew would be a challenging year." (Revenue up 1.2%, PPP up 0.8%)

        2. "Revenue, Profits Soar at Baker Botts Amid Contingency Wins," 02.08.17.
          The Texas Lawyer reports that "Houston-based Baker Botts posted a record year in 2016, with revenue up 20.2 percent compared with 2015, and profits per partner up 36.6 percent." (Login required)

        3. "Weil Sees Big Gains in Profits, Revenue," 02.06.17.
          The American Lawyer reports that "Weil, Gotshal & Manges posted notable increases in both revenue and profits in 2016, signaling that the firm has put post-recession cutbacks firmly in its rearview mirror." (Revenue up 9%, PPP up 22%) (Login required)



        February 3, 2017

        1. "Norton Rose Fulbright, Chadbourne & Parke Confirm Merger Talks," 02.02.17.
          The American Lawyer reports that "New York-based Chadbourne & Parke and international giant Norton Rose Fulbright confirmed Thursday that they were exploring a potential merger."

          1. "Norton Rose Fulbright, Chadbourne Chase Merger as Project Pipeline Thaws," 02.02.17.
            And even more on this potential merger from the American Lawyer: " a deal that would create a nearly 4,000-lawyer firm, with roughly $2 billion in combined revenues and particular strength in global energy sector deals, project finance and disputes."

        2. "LSAT scores at high-risk schools getting worse, according to analysis by law school reform group," 02.02.17.
          The ABA Journal reports that Law School Transparency has published its 2017 State of Legal Education report, finding many more schools admitting students with lower LSAT profiles than a similar report found two years ago.

        3. "Stanford Law Prof's Novel Satirizes 'US News' Rankings Horse Race," 02.02.17.
          Karen Sloan speaks with Paul Goldstein, the author of the new novel Legal Asylum, a "blistering satire" that sends up the legal academy's obsession with US News rankings, as reported here on Law.com.

        4. "What It Costs When Talent Walks Out the Door," 02.01.17.
          A behavioral economist writing for the American Lawyer shares new research on the high costs of replacing top talent at law firms and asserts that "to replace top female talent, it takes months longer and costs more (as a percentage of salary) than it does to woo top male talent."

        5. "Focusing on 'forward thinking,' ABA president-elect seeks to restructure Legal Ed section," 02.01.17.
          The ABA Journal reports that the ABA Board of Governors will consider a controversial proposal this weekend from incoming ABA President Hilarie Bass that would restructure the ABA's Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar leaving only the accrediting function to the current section and its council, and would create a new Commission on the Future of Legal Education that would take over all programs, publications, and non-accreditation-focused activities related to legal education.

          1. "ABA President-Elect Moves to Winnow Legal Education Section's Role," 02.01.17.
            More on this from Law.com: "A battle is brewing within the American Bar Association over control of law schools."

        6. "California Law School Deans Want Bar Exam Pass Score Lowered," 02.01.17.
          The Recorder reports that "the deans of 20 California law schools on Wednesday asked the state Supreme Court to temporarily lower the bar exam's minimum passing score to let the State Bar study whether the number is unjustifiably low." (Login required)

        7. "The World's Most Powerful Women: February 1," 02.01.17.
          In an article about women lawyers taking the lead among lawyers offering free legal services to immigrants caught in the new immigration policy, Fortune cites NALP data for the proposition that women law grads are more likely to pursue public interest careers than their male peers.

        8. "Speaking Millennial: Understanding the Next Generation of Attorneys," 02.01.17.
          Law.com reports on a Thomson Reuters program designed "to help address the increasing generational gap at law firms and legal departments." (Login required)

        9. "On the Bright Side, Lawyers Are Suddenly Popular," 01.31.17.
          This column from The Recorder highlights the important role that lawyers have played in the first days of the new administration: "Well done, lawyers. You're making us proud." (Login required)

        10. "GCs May Get Rid of Underperforming Firms in 2017, Survey Says," 01.31.17.
          The American Lawyer reports that according to new ACC survey results, "nearly 50 percent of global general counsel and chief legal officers say they might end a law firm or outside counsel relationship this year because of underperformance."

        11. "An Architectural Approach to Law Department Diversity," 01.31.17.
          A good article from Corporate Counsel on law department diversity, emphasizing that "without a detailed blueprint agreed upon by senior leadership, any diversity initiatives tend to be short-lived." (Login required)

        12. "Study finds law firms and corporations increasingly turning to alternative legal service providers," 01.31.17.
          The ABA Journal reports on the findings of a new report (Thomson Reuters/Georgetown/ Oxford) that documents how law firms and corporations are using alternative legal service providers: "The study found that 51 percent of law firms and 60 percent of corporations are already using ALSPs ... and an additional 21 percent of law firms and 14 percent of corporations are planning to use an ALSP in the coming year." You can find the Thomson Reuters press release about the study here, and the study results here.

        13. Touch Bar Barred from NC Bar Exam," 01.31.17.
          Inside Higher Ed reports that "law students in North Carolina who bought Apple's latest MacBook Pro laptop need to disable its signature feature in order to take the state bar exam."

        14. "The 4 Major Obstacles STILL Facing Women in the Legal Profession," 01.30.17
          LawFuel, noting that "inequality and a lack of access to partnership is a continuing problem for many in the profession," identifies four distinct obstacles facing women.

        15. "For Immigration Help, Universities Turn to Law School Clinics," 01.30.17.
          The National Law Journal reports that a "growing number of universities [are] looking to their law schools to help protect and guide fellow students, faculty and staff in the wake of [the] executive order banning citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States." (Login required)

        16. "Dechert Revenues Up 2.4 Percent Amid Modest Rise in Profits," 01.30.17.
          In the kickoff of the law firm year-end financial reporting season, the Legal Intelligencer reports that Dechert revenues increased by 2.4 percent and profits per partner increased by 1.6 percent in 2016. (Login required)

        17. "How and Why to Hire a Law Student," 01.30.17.
          Lawyerist.com provides some advice for law firms about hiring law student help, including a list of steps to make the experience valuable for both the firm and the student.

        18. "Charlotte Law Prof Starts Food Bank For School's Students," 01.30.17.
          Law.com reports that "a professor at the struggling Charlotte School of Law has started a makeshift food pantry in the school's commons to help students whose federal loans have been revoked by the US Department of Education amid concerns over the school's educational quality." (Login required)

          1. "Charlotte School of Law prof seeks donations to help students with food and rent money," 01.30.17.
            And the ABA Journal also reports on this development: "A GoFundMe page has been set up to help Charlotte School of Law students with their living expenses after a recent US Department of Education decision that they will not receive federal loan money for the spring semester."

          2. "Food Drive for Students at For-Profit Law School," 01.30.17
            More on this from Inside Higher Ed.

        19. "Clients Are Splitting Litigation Into Affordable Pieces, Report Says," 01.27.17.
          Corporate Counsel reports on an upcoming Fordham Law Review article that argues "law practice is experiencing two parallel shifts: civil procedure amendments are focusing on cost and resource drain, and the private market is giving in-house departments more options to unbundle legal work for lower costs."


        January 27, 2017

        1. "Preparing Lawyers to be Practice-Ready in a Tech-Driven World," 01.26.17.
        Law.com takes a look at what several law schools are doing to prepare law students to practice in a world driven by technology.

        2. "Here are the Top 10 Lifestyle Law Schools," 01.26.17.
        Research staff at ALM have spent their time devising a ranking of law schools based on the lifestyle available to students, published here on Law.com.

        3. "Not Only Elite Law Schools Offer Great Returns on Investment," 01.24.17.
        The New York Times reports on new research from student loan refinancer SoFi that evaluated law schools for value based on salary and debt records for new law grads.

        4. "Showdown Over Law Schools' Bar Pass Standard Set for Feb. 6," 01.24.17.
        Law.com reports on the controversy over the new bar passage standard that will be considered by the ABA House of Delegates at its upcoming meeting in February — 94 deans have written to ask the House of Delegates to postpone their consideration of the matter.

        5. "Navigating the multi-polar legal market," 01.24.17.
        The latest from Jordan Furlong at Law21, assessing the changes in the legal market, and the lack thereof, since the recession, and arguing that further change is in the wings (he also plugs his forthcoming book on this topic).

        6. "Richest Firms Pulled Ahead in 2016 as Some Regions Struggled," 01.23.17.
        The American Lawyer takes a look at the year-end report issued by Wells Fargo Private Bank's Legal Specialty Group that found "the top performing law firms continued to pull away from the rest of the Am Law 200 last year."

        7. "The Evolution of the 'Virtual Law Firm'," 01.23.17.
        Legaltech News takes a look at virtual law firms, and some of the technology fueling ever-growing lawyer mobility.

        8. "Trump Orders Broad Hiring Freeze for Federal Government," 01.23.17.
        The New York Times reports that "President Trump on Monday ordered an across-the-board employment freeze for the federal government, halting hiring for all new and existing positions except those in national security, public safety and the military."

          a. "Trump freezes hiring of many federal workers," 01.23.17.
          More on this from The Washington Post.

        9. "Obama Legacy: The True Impact Of Having Two Black Lawyers In The White House," 01.20.17.
        Essence, writing about the significance of the Obamas in the White House, cites NALP data for the proposition that Black and women lawyers remain dramatically underrepresented.

        10. "6 Tips for Avoiding the Worst Student Loan Repayment Traps," 01.20.17.
        The New York Times provides advice for student borrowers about how to stay out of trouble with lenders and loan servicers.

        11. "Reinventing Professionals: The art of investing in legal technology," 01.20.17.
        Ari Kaplan interviews a venture capital partner who invests in legal technology startups — the Q&A appears in the ABA Journal.

        12. "Study shows law firm senior leadership still largely white and male," 01.17.17.
        Legal Feeds reports on new research that shows "women and racialized lawyers continue to be under-represented in the Canadian legal profession with Caucasian men continuing to far outnumber those two groups in senior leadership roles."

        13. "Job Listings That Are Too 'Feminine' for Men," 01.16.17.
        The New York Times reports on new research by Textio that analyzed 50 million job listings for language that provokes disproportionate responses from men or women.

          a. "How gender bias sneaks into job listings," 01.17.17.
          More on this research from Bizwomen.



        January 20, 2017

        1. "Negotiations to Keep Charlotte Law School Afloat Collapse," 01.19.17.
        Law.com reports that "negotiations between the US Department of Education and the Charlotte School of Law to allow current students to complete their studies at the beleaguered school have broken down, calling into question whether Charlotte will reopen Monday as planned."

          a. "Charlotte School of Law vows to fight Dept. of Ed's 'final' ruling denying student financial aid," 01.19.17.
          The ABA Journal provides this update on the status of Charlotte School of Law, reporting that the school has backed away from a teach-out plan.

          b. "Teach-out plan for Charlotte School of Law in the works," 01.17.17.
          The ABA Journal reports that Charlotte School of Law will file a teach-out plan, essentially detailing plans for winding down the law school's operations.

        2. "Proposal to tighten ABA bar-pass standards criticized by deans and state bar president," 01.19.17.
        The ABA Journal reports that "a group of 90 law school deans asked the council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar to pull a proposal that would tighten accreditation requirements on bar passage rates."

        3. "Two More Big Firms Tap New Diversity Heads," 01.19.17.
        The American Lawyer reports that Baker McKenzie and Buchanan, Ingersoll & Rooney have each hired new chief diversity and inclusion officers.

        4. "Number of LSAT tests administered jumps nearly 8 percent; is optimism or scheduling the reason?," 01.18.17.
        The ABA Journal reports that "the number of LSAT tests administered in December increased 7.6% over December of last year."

        5. "Student Loan Collector Cheated Millions, Lawsuits Say," 01.18.17.
        The New York Times reports that a federal regulator and two state attorneys general have filed lawsuits against Navient, the nation's largest servicer of student loans, alleging that the company illegally drove up loan repayment costs for millions of borrowers.

        6. "America's Great Working-Class Colleges," 01.18.17.
        David Leonhardt, writing for The New York Times, reviews new research that shows that colleges that enroll large numbers of poor and middle-class students (not elite schools) continue to do a good job of providing social and economic mobility for a large number of graduates.

        7. "Student Debt Payback Far Worse Than Believed," 01.18.17.
        The Wall Street Journal reports that new DOE data suggests that "many more students have defaulted on or failed to pay back their college loans than the US Government previously believed." (Subscription required.)

        8. "ABA Center for Innovation taking fellowship applications for those who would improve the law," 01.18.17.
        The ABA Journal reports that the ABA Center for Innovation is accepting fellowship applications from both new and experienced lawyers for projects to improve the legal industry.

        9. "Global Law Firms Turn to Africa," 01.18.17.
        Global Lawyer News and The American Lawyer report that "South Africa has been hit by a flood of global law firms seeking lucrative new markets."

        10. "Asian-Americans are underrepresented in influential legal jobs, study says," 01.17.17.
        The ABA Journal reports on new research from Yale Law School that suggests Asian-Americans, while well-represented in the legal profession, are underrepresented among the top ranks of the legal profession.

        11. "For Legal Education, Adaptation is the Only Option for a Better Future," 01.16.17.
        Frank Wu, writing for The National Law Journal, recounts the many challenges facing legal education and suggests that the only way forward is through adaptation and change.

        12. "How Out-of-State Schools Fared on California Bar Exam," 01.13.17.
        The Recorder reports on newly released data for California's July 2016 bar exam on the performance of graduates from out-of-state law schools — the data "suggests struggles with the bar exam also extended to students elsewhere around the country."

        13. "Evolve Law Launches In-House Counsel Technology Fellowship," 01.13.16.
        Legaltech News reports that Evolve Law has established a new fellowship program to educate in-house counsel about implementing document automation in their legal workflows.

        14. "Programs That Are Predatory: It's Not Just the For-Profit Colleges," 01.13.17.
        The New York Times' Upshot tackles the DOE list published last week that includes "hundreds of college programs that load students with more debt than they can afford to pay," a list that includes five law schools and an arts program at Harvard.

        15. "Billable hour pricing is effectively dead because of budget caps, report says," 01.12.17.
        In recapping the highlights of the 2017 Report on the State of the Legal Market (Georgetown/Thomson Reuters), released last week, the ABA Journal zeroes in on what the report had to say about the (death of the) traditional billable hour pricing model. You can read the report here.

        16. "How Do I Raise Work-Life Balance Without Coming Off as a Slacker?," 01.10.17.
        Julie Brush, writing for The Recorder, provides advice about the do's and don'ts of raising work-life balance issues in an interview.



        January 13, 2017

        1. "10 Years Out, Report Says Recession's Impact on Firms is Clear," 01.12.17.
        The American Lawyer reports on the release of the 2017 Report on the State of the Legal Market, published by the Center for the Study of the Legal Profession at the Georgetown University Law Center and Thomson Reuters' Peer Monitor: "The report examines the challenges the legal industry has faced in the 10 years since the start of the Great Recession, and how law firms have had to change the way they operate to accommodate their clients' budgetary needs. Perhaps the most significant challenge has been clients' insistence on predictable and manageable bills." (You can download a complimentary copy of the report here.)

        2. "Meet The Law Firm Paying First-Years $200K," 01.12.17.
        Today's General Counsel reports (via ATL) that a California litigation boutique is paying its first year lawyers $200,000.

        3. "A Modern Associate Manifesto (Beta)," 01.12.17.
        An associate blogging for Slaw lays down the gauntlet, criticizing the current law firm business and staffing models, and offering "actionable advice" to law firms that want a better way forward. (If nothing else, this should be a required read for partners who want to get into the heads of their current junior associates: "Times have changed. The best people will not necessarily work for you on old terms anymore.")

        4. "Optimizing your law firm for trust," 01.11.17.
        The latest from Jordan Furlong at Law21, wherein he takes up the question "What would a law firm look like if it were optimized for trust? That is to say, if a law firm reordered its priorities and re-engineered its processes so that its activities were bent towards increasing the degree to which its clients completely and implicitly trusted the firm, what would that look like?"

        5. "Two Law Schools Get an 'F' for High Student Debt from Education Dept.," 01.11.17.
        The National Law Journal reports on the latest fallout from the Department of Education's enforcement of the gainful employment rule, involving five law schools: "Florida Coastal School of Law and Charleston School of Law are identified as failing on the department's 'gainful employment list,' released Monday. Should those schools fail a second year in a row, they will lose access to federal student loan funds." (Arizona Summit and Western State College of Law were also flagged.)

          a. "Department of Education flags 5 law schools' debt-to-income ratios, including 3 in Infilaw System," 01.11.17.
          More on this from the ABA Journal.

          b. "Overburdened With Debt," 01.10.17.
          More on the DOE's enforcement of the gainful employment rule from Inside Higher Ed — nearly 2,000 institutions were cited, including five law schools.

        6. "Is Doomsday Imminent for Charlotte Law School?," 01.10.17.
        Karen Sloan, writing for The National Law Journal, reports that the opening of Charlotte Law School has now been delayed until at least January 27 as school officials work to secure tuition financing for its students after losing federal loan eligibility.

          a. "Charlotte School of Law students reportedly will receive spring loan money," 01.10.17.
          The ABA Journal reports that Charlotte School of Law has said that classes are scheduled to begin January 17 and that spring semester student loan proceeds will be disbursed, despite a DOE finding that the school was no longer eligible to receive federal loan funds.

          b. "Embattled Charlotte School of Law to Reopen," 01.10.17.
          And Inside Higher Ed reports that Charlotte Law School will reopen this semester: "Without access to federal aid, the school said on its website that students might need to explore 'bridge financing' such as private loans."

          c. "Troubled Charlotte Law School Will Open for Spring Semester," 01.09.17.
          The National Law Journal reports that administrators at Charlotte Law School have informed students that the school will remain open, although the question of financing for students remains unanswered.

        7. "With Competition Fierce, Even Elite Law Firms Resort to the Unusual," 01.09.16.
        Elizabeth Olson, writing for The New York Times, delves into the fiercely competitive lateral partner market and other ways "fierce competition is prompting firms to take unusual steps to bolster their profiles."

        8. "Firm Leaders Showing More Economic Confidence in 2017," 01.09.17.
        Law.com reports on the results of an October law firm leader survey conducted by Citi Private Bank's law firm group, noting that law firm leaders expect modest growth in both demand for legal services and revenue in 2017. (You can read the Citi report here.)

        9. "Penn State Names Minnesota Professor as New Law Dean," 01.06.17.
        The Legal Intelligencer reports that "Pennsylvania State University has tapped Hari Osofsky…as the new dean of its University Park law campus."

        10. "Legal Industry Outpaces US Jobs Figures for December," 01.06.17.
        The American Lawyer reports that "after losing 500 jobs in November, US legal sector employment rebounded in December, adding 2,000 jobs, according to preliminary data released Friday by the US Labor Department." ("…the sector remains more than 52,000 jobs shy of its pre-recession high in 2007.")

        11. "The Profitability Quick Fix That Isn't," 01.01.17.
        The data crunchers at The American Lawyer report that their data analysis "yields a counterintuitive and surprising result: A statistically significant correlation exists between the ratio of nonequity to equity partners and declining PPP." In other words, trying to prop up profits per partner by promoting associates to nonequity rather than equity status is actually counterproductive.

        12. Roundup of additional coverage of the new NALP report on law firm diversity, issued last week:

          a. "What Happened To All The Black Women Lawyers?," 01.10.17. (Madam Noire)

          b. "Minority law firm representation up modestly post-recession," 01.09.17. (The Indiana Lawyer)

          c. "US law firms failing to attract and retain black women lawyers," 01.09.17. (The Global Legal Post)

          d. "Law Firms Struggle to Hire and Keep Black Women," 01.06.17. (Bloomberg)

          e. "Diversity In The Legal Profession Has Flatlined Since the Great Recession; Who Is To Blame?," 01.06.17. (Above the Law)



        January 6, 2017

        1. "Could Spreading the Bar Exam Over Three Years Raise Passage Rates?," 01.05.17.
        The National Law Journal reports on a discussion taking place at the AALS conference this week about falling bar passage rates and what might be done about it.

        2. "Law Students Performed 2.2 Million Pro Bono Hours Last Year," 01.05.17.
        The National Law Journal reports on the results of a new AALS survey of law student pro bono hours, released this week at the AALS conference in San Francisco.

        3. "Top Canadian Firm Scoops Up E-Discovery Shop," 01.05.17.
        The American Lawyer reports that "McCarthy Tetrault, one of Canada's largest firms, announced Thursday a first-of-its-kind deal that will see it absorb Wortsmans, a leading electronic discovery firm in Toronto."

        4. "More Older Americans Taking Out Student Loans," 01.05.17.
        The Wall Street Journal reports that a new report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau shows that the number of older Americans with student loans is growing rapidly (the loans are often taken to finance the educations of children or grandchildren). (Subscription required.)

          a. "Growth in Numbers of Older Student Loan Borrowers," 01.06.17.
          More on this from Inside Higher Ed: "Older Americans are the fastest-growing group in the student loan market and nearly 40 percent of borrowers over 65 were in default in 2015."

        5. "Asians and Hispanics Make Small Diversity Gains in Firms," 01.04.17.
        The American Lawyer reports on NALP's latest report on law firm diversity, noting that "Asians and Hispanic men accounted for nearly all of the minority gains among the associate ranks over the last five years, while the percentage of black associates actually fell over that period of time."

          a. "Women and Minorities Make Slow Progress in Filling Ranks at Law Firms," 01.04.17.
          The New York Times reports on the new NALP report on law firm diversity demographics.

          b. "NALP report on law firm diversity highlights 'incredibly slow pace of change'," 01.04.17.
          The ABA Journal also reports on the new law firm diversity findings from NALP.

          c. "Women and Black/African American Associates Still Below Pre-Recession Numbers Despite Small Gains in 2016 Overall," 01.04.17.
          You can read the NALP press release here, and you can read the full report here (PDF).

        6. "New in Career Counseling: Brain Wave Scanning," 01.04.17.
        Inside Higher Ed reports that the Royal Bank of Scotland is using a brain wave-sensing headset at career fairs to determine which jobs are most catching students' interests.

        7. "Meet the New President of the American Association of Law Schools," 01.03.17.
        The National Law Journal speaks with incoming AALS President Paul Marcus, a longtime professor at the College of William and Mary Marshall-Wythe School of Law, about his goals for the coming year.

        8. "Harvard Dean Martha Minow to Step Down," 01.03.17.
        The National Law Journal reports that Martha Minow, dean of Harvard Law School since 2009, will step down at the end of the academic year.

        9. "Congratulations, You Made Partner! Now What?," 01.01.17.
        The American Lawyer asked seasoned partners at law firms across the country to give advice to new partners.

        10. "Fraud Claims Against Arizona Summit Law School Tossed," 12.29.16.
        The National Law Journal reports that "a federal judge has dismissed fraud claims against Arizona Summit Law School brought by a former student and employee who alleged the school misrepresented incoming students' grades and Law School Admission Test scores."

        11. "4 Ways Technology Is Changing Contracts," 12.29.16.
        Legaltech News reports that automation, natural language processing, and data handling technology are driving changes to traditional contract work that could change its basic structure.

          a. "Smart Contracts 101 for the Non-Techie Lawyer," 01.05.17.
          Legaltech News provides a primer on smart contracts, and the new roles and skills they will demand of attorneys.

          b. "Relax Lawyers, Nick Szabo Says Smart Contract Won't Kill Jobs," 12.08.16.
          And in a related piece, CoinDesk reports that one of the pioneers of smart contracts, speaking at a Microsoft event in New York, said that smart contracts are making new things possible but they are not likely to eliminate lawyer jobs.

        12. "What Employers Will Worry About in 2017," 12.28.16.
        Fortune reports on a new study that reveals "the biggest priority, and concern, for business leaders in 2017 will be retaining employees in a competitive talent market."

        13. "Resilience," 12.28.16.
        A good post on resilience from Slaw, noting that while lawyers as a group exhibit low levels of resilience, "there are proven ways to boost one's resilience allowing for a greater ability to deal with and recover from unsettling and upsetting situations and will become a key skill for tacking anxiety and depression in the profession."

        14. "Bankruptcy Becomes an Option for Some Borrowers Burdened by Student Loans," 12.27.16.
        The Wall Street Journal reports that "borrowers are beginning to win battles to erase some student loans in bankruptcy court, overcoming stiff obstacles that have generally blocked that path except in extreme case of financial hardship." (Subscription required.)

        15. "Flat Enrollment Overall Masks Wide Swings Among Programs," 12.22.16.
        The New York Law Journal reports that while overall enrollment at New York law schools grew by just 13 this fall, enrollment varied greatly at individual schools, with some reporting large increases in first-year class size and others reporting large decreases.

        16. "How Subtle Class Cues Can Backfire on Your Resume," 12.21.16.
        Two business school professors, writing for the Harvard Business Review, write about their field research with large law firms — a resume audit project that found that men with resume markers that signaled wealth or higher economic class received more interview invitations at elite law firms than all other applicants combined (strikingly, similar resumes from women did not experience the same bounce). Key takeaway: "Eliminating signals about class and gender as resumes are screened could open the door more widely for talented individuals with varied backgrounds, while creating a more diverse workforce of qualified talent."

        17. "Michigan man's case against American Bar Association & LSAT could go the US Supreme Court," 12.20.16.
        Michigan Public Radio reports that a blind man who was denied admission to law school is taking his case to the US Supreme Court.

        18. "ABA Accuses Government of Reneging on Law School Loan Forgiveness," 12.20.16.
        The National Law Journal reports that "the American Bar Association and a group of individual public interest lawyers sued the US Department of Education on Tuesday claiming that the agency illegally walked back on a loan-forgiveness program meant to encourage attorneys to take low-paying public-sector positions."

          a. "ABA sues Department of Education over retroactive denials to lawyers under Public Service Loan Forgiveness," 12.20.16.
          The ABA Journal also reports on this litigation challenging the retroactive denial of eligibility under PSLF for plaintiffs who had already had their public service careers approved for the program and who had made decisions and loan payments based on those approvals.

          b. "ABA Sues Education Dept. on Loan Forgiveness," 12.21.16.
          More on this from Inside Higher Ed.

        19. "Social Security Checks Are Being Reduced for Unpaid Student Debt," 12.20.16.
        The Wall Street Journal reports that "the federal government is increasingly taking money out of American's Social Security checks to recover millions in unpaid student debt, a trend set to accelerate as more baby boomers retire," and a development that is leaving many with Social Security earnings below the poverty line. (Subscription required.)

          a. "Student Loans Lead to Reduced Social Security Payments for More Older Borrowers," 12.20.16.
          The Chronicle of Higher Education also reports on the new GAO report that highlights the growing number of older Americans who are having to repay their defaulted student debt through garnishments of their Social Security benefits.

        20. "Education Dept. Denies Student-Aid Funds to For-Profit Law School," 12.19.16.
        The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that "the US Department of Education will end access to federal student aid for the Charlotte School of Law, a for-profit institution." The Department of Education Press Release can be viewed here.

          a. "Education Department denies federal student aid to for-profit NC law school," 12.19.16.
          The Washington Post also reports on this story: "The Education Department on Monday said Charlotte School of Law can no longer receive federal loans and grants for misleading students about their chances of passing the bar and its shaky accreditation with the American Bar Association."

          b. "Federal student financial aid yanked at Charlotte School of Law," 12.19.16.
          The ABA Journal reports on this development, and includes a statement by Barry Currier, the managing director of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar.

          c. "Charlotte School of Law loses federal aid over 'dishonest' practices," 12.19.16.
          More on this from The Charlotte Observer.

          d. "Federal Aid Cut to For-Profit Law School," 12.20.16.
          And Inside Higher Ed also has the story.

          e. "Law School DENIED Access To Federal Student Loan Dollars," 12.19.16.
          And Above the Law reports on this development, and hosts a copy of the 14-page letter sent to Charlotte Law School from the DOE.

          f. "Charlotte School of Law students express anger at school, circulate petition for free tuition," 12.22.16.
          The ABA Journal reports that students at Charlotte law school are angry, and scrambling to figure out what comes next, in the wake of the US Department of Education announcement that it is cutting off federal student financial aid for the school — and two students have files a class action that accuses the school of engaging in misrepresentation, unjust enrichment, breach of fiduciary duty, and constructive fraud.

        21. "Women Make Up Majority of US Law Students for First Time," 12.16.16.
        The New York Times takes note of the fact that the latest release of ABA consumer data shows that women now make up more than 50% of law students in accredited US law schools.

          a. "Women outnumber men in law schools for the first time, newly updated data show," 12.19.16.
          More on this from the ABA Journal.



        December 22, 2016

        1. "To Boost the Economy, Help Students First," 12.21.16.
        This New York Times op-ed, written by a university president who served as chairwoman of the FDIC, advocates scrapping the current complex federal student loan repayment system and replacing it with a single repayment plan based on income where payments are built into the tax withholding system.

        2. "ABA Accuses Government of Reneging on Law School Loan Forgiveness," 12.20.16.
        The National Law Journal reports that "the American Bar Association and a group of individual public interest lawyers sued the US Department of Education on Tuesday claiming that the agency illegally walked back on a loan-forgiveness program meant to encourage attorneys to take low-paying public-sector positions."

          a. "ABA sues Department of Education over retroactive denials to lawyers under Public Service Loan Forgiveness," 12.20.16.
          The ABA Journal also reports on this litigation challenging the retroactive denial of eligibility under PSLF for plaintiffs who had already had their public service careers approved for the program and who had made decisions and loan payments based on those approvals.

          b. "ABA Sues Education Dept. on Loan Forgiveness," 12.21.16.
          More on this from Inside Higher Ed.

        3. "Social Security Checks Are Being Reduced for Unpaid Student Debt," 12.20.16.
        The Wall Street Journal reports that "the federal government is increasingly taking money out of American's Social Security checks to recover millions in unpaid student debt, a trend set to accelerate as more baby boomers retire," and a development that is leaving many with Social Security earnings below the poverty line. (Subscription required.)

          a. "Student Loans Lead to Reduced Social Security Payments for More Older Borrowers," 12.20.16.
          The Chronicle of Higher Education also reports on the new GAO report that highlights the growing number of older Americans who are having to repay their defaulted student debt through garnishments of their Social Security benefits.

        4. "Another Big Law Firm Stumbles," 12.20.16.
        Steven J. Harper, writing for The American Lawyer, draws lessons from the unraveling of another big law firm: "The lesson for big law firms seems obvious. Since the demise of Dewey, that lesson has also gone unheeded. A true partnership requires a compensation structure that rewards partner-like behavior — collegiality, mentoring, expansion and transition of client relationships to fellow partners, and a consensus to pursue long-term strategies promoting institutional stability rather than maximizing short-term profit metrics."

        5. "For Midsize NYC Firms, 2016 Highlighted Need to Merge," 12.20.16.
        The New York Law Journal writes that 2016 was a tipping point for regional New York firms in the Am Law 200, most of which are "finding it increasingly difficult to compete without a large merger."

        6. "Education Dept. Denies Student-Aid Funds to For-Profit Law School," 12.19.16.
        The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that "the US Department of Education will end access to federal student aid for the Charlotte School of Law, a for-profit institution." The Department of Education Press Release can be viewed here.

          a. "Education Department denies federal student aid to for-profit NC law school," 12.19.16.
          The Washington Post also reports on this story: "The Education Department on Monday said Charlotte School of Law can no longer receive federal loans and grants for misleading students about their chances of passing the bar and its shaky accreditation with the American Bar Association."

          b. "Federal student financial aid yanked at Charlotte School of Law," 12.19.16.
          The ABA Journal reports on this development, and includes a statement by Barry Currier, the managing director of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar.

          c. "Charlotte School of Law loses federal aid over 'dishonest' practices," 12.19.16.
          More on this from The Charlotte Observer.

          d. "Federal Aid Cut to For-Profit Law School," 12.20.16.
          And Inside Higher Ed also has the story.

          e. "Law School DENIED Access To Federal Student Loan Dollars," 12.19.16.
          And Above the Law reports on this development, and hosts a copy of the 14-page letter sent to Charlotte Law School from the DOE.

        7. "UC-Hastings Gives Leadership Nod to Interim Dean," 12.19.16.
        The Recorder reports that "UC-Hastings College of the Law's acting Chancellor and Dean, David Faigman, will stay on in that role permanently."

          a. "UC-Hastings Law Dean to Focus on Bar Passage, Real Estate Development," 12.20.16.
          And The Recorder has more on the new UC-Hastings law dean.

        8. "Top Partners at Kirkland See Cuts to Equity Shares," 12.16.16.
        The American Lawyer reports that Kirkland & Ellis has adjusted its equity allocation among partners, cutting the equity shares of some partners, particularly litigators.

        9. "Sutherland-Eversheds Deal Catapults Atlanta Firm Onto Global Scene," 12.16.16.
        The Daily Report has more on the Sutherland-Eversheds merger that was approved on Friday: "Sutherland will now be part of a global, 2,300-lawyer firm to be called Eversheds Sutherland."

        10. "Women Make Up Majority of US Law Students for First Time," 12.16.16.
        The New York Times takes note of the fact that the latest release of ABA consumer data shows that women now make up more than 50% of law students in accredited US law schools.

          a. "Women outnumber men in law schools for the first time, newly updated data show," 12.19.16.
          More on this from the ABA Journal.

        11. "Blockchain 101 for the Non-Techie Lawyer," 12.14.16.
        If you're still uncertain what blockchain is and why it is one of the most potent technologies currently disrupting traditional law practice, this piece from Corporate Counsel does a great job of demystifying.

National Association for Law Placement, Inc.® (NALP®)
1220 19th Street NW, Suite 401, Washington, DC 20036-2405
(202) 835-1001 info@nalp.org
© Copyright 2017 NALP

STAY CONNECTED



View Full Site